One of the things I hate about the getting-to-know-you phase as you establish relationships with people, is the lame attempts to establish some form of commonality. More to the point, I really detest the “Mr. Me Too” asshats that I encounter on occasion in life. You know, the people who are compelled to meet any discussion of your achievements, accomplishments or activities with the juvenile practice of one-upmanship?

Yeah, people like that I can’t deal with ever; not in a manner that would require us to be friends. Which is really funny considering I just accepted a Facebook friend request from an old college “acquaintance” who fits the description of the very type of person I’m talking about. Yep, the minute they start speaking I start thinking cheesy cornball used car salesman, in a cheap ugly plaid polyester suit, smacking gum as they tell me lies.

Oh yeah, that sounds just like my old college buddy, and Mississippi governor Haley Barbour in a recent Human Events interview with Peter Robinson. In it, Barbour has raised a hornets nest with the following:
[T]he people who led the change of parties in the South, just as I mentioned earlier, was my generation. My generation who went to integrated schools — I went to integrated college, um, never thought twice about it. And it was the old Democrats who had fought for segregation so hard. By my time, people realized that was the past, it was indefensible, it wasn’t gonna be that way any more. So the people who really changed the South from Democrat to Republican was a different generation from those who fought integration.Sorry Mister Barbour, I was born at night but not last night. Sorry pal, but forty or fifty odd years ago you were in your early twenties, and barely of age to purchase liquor. That said, it’s hard to believe that his generation lead any efforts to create a fair and just existence for the then segregated blacks citizens of the south; and in particular, the state of Mississippi.

I know we’re post racial now and all, but please don’t bullshit me.

Steve Kornaki’s piece, “The GOP’s new fake racial history” over at Salon, shines a 10,000 watt spotlight on the egregious attempt at revisionist history which paints today’s republican party as Negro friendly in lockstep with the heroes of the civil rights movement. Anyone with integrity who is not of the intellectually dishonest persuasion will tell you that the old racist democrats of the south migrated to what’s now the republican party.

Interestingly, David Weigel points out that this isn’t the first time Barbour has pulled the “race card” for political expediency. In 1982 he challenged Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.), who was then the last of the dying breed of segregationists in politics. Back then, he pointed out Stennis’ racist voting record so as to appeal to black voters. One can suggest that he’s attempting to do the same as he tunes up for 2012’s presidential run.

Sorry Haley, by racist southern standards, blacks are dumb. But Negroes who voted for Obama in 2008, aren’t as dumb as you think they are. At least not as dumb as the ones who identify themselves as Black Republicans, who choose to believe and digest the turds that you spewed from that gaping hole on your face.

See what happens when Glenn Beck reclaims the civil rights movement?