By Seattle Slim

Let me preface by saying that I haven’t yet read the “choreopoem” that is “For Colored Girls Who’ve Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Enuf” yet, but I will. That won’t stop me from going to see the movie.

Yes, I’m going to see the movie. I don’t care if Tyler Perry’s name is attached or not. It looks like it has depth, tons of emotion and I can appreciate the fact that these sisters are giving me some kind of dimension.

It’s nice to see a movie featuring an all-star cast of black women, who obviously come from a variety of different backgrounds. It’s not every day that you see something like this, and after JUST now seeing the first Sex and the City movie on bootleg, I am all the way behind this.

Of course, there are people who won’t go see it because it’s a Tyler Perry project. Whatever. I can’t see penalizing these actresses and what could be awesome performances because of issues with Tyler Perry. These actresses deserve a chance. There are people, however, who are complaining about the content and how it’s “depressing.” Well, from what I gathered, the play/choreopoem wasn’t all rainbows and unicorn shit, either, so how can the movie be any brighter?

Domestic violence, abortion, suicide, and all the other issues addressed in the book are not pretty. What do these people want? A scene in which one character talks about how her abortion was “totes” traumatizing while shopping for Manolo Blahniks?

I’m not saying that I wouldn’t want to see a feel good film featuring an ensemble cast of black women, but the few comparisons I’ve seen to Sex and the City leave a vile taste in my mouth. I couldn’t even bare to get through the first movie. It was full of weak, mealy mouthed women who were trite, basic and too damned grown to be acting the way they were acting. There were some good parts, but for the most part, it was lame and their dignity was gone.

As a woman of color, I also couldn’t get it. Oh, to only have to worry about which Diane Von Furstenberg dress to wear! What a life that would be, right? And to be honest, I’m not even from a “hood” really, although my beginnings were extremely humble, I still couldn’t identify with SATC and I wouldn’t be able to really identify with a black version of such a sad sack movie either.

Okay, I didn’t mean for this to turn into another tirade against SATC, but it is me taking issue with people who would praise something like that over something like “For Colored Girls.”

I’m not all about supporting bullshit just because it’s packaged in “black” wrapping, but I think this movie deserves our attention, so that we can make our voices better heard.  Could it be better?  Could we do better?  I don’t know.  I’m not going to judge it without seeing it.